CPR R US

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Courses
HeartSavers First Aid CPR & AED

The AHA’s Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED course trains participants to provide first aid, CPR, and use an automated external defibrillator (AED) safely, promptly, and effectively. Reflects science and education from the American Heart Association Guidelines Update for CPR and Emergency Cardiovascular Care (ECC).

AHA Instructor Requirements.

The AHA’s Heartsaver First Aid CPR AED Course is designed for anyone with little or no medical training who needs a course completion card for their job, regulatory (e.g., OSHA), or other requirements, or anyone who wants to be prepared for an emergency in any setting.

What does this course teach?
  • First aid basics
  • Medical emergencies
  • Injury emergencies
  • Environmental emergencies
  • Preventing illness and injury
  • Adult CPR and AED use
  • Opioid-associated life-threatening emergencies
  • Optional modules in Child CPR AED and Infant CPR

 

Basic Life Support (BLS)

BLS is geared towards prehospital providers, like EMTs, paramedics, firefighters, and in-facility hospital providers. Upon completing the course, students receive a course completion card, valid for two years. Please contact your employer to ensure that you are selecting the correct course.

Who should take this course?

The AHA’s BLS Course is designed for healthcare professionals and other personnel who need to know how to perform CPR and other basic cardiovascular life support skills in a wide variety of in-facility and prehospital settings.

  • High-quality CPR for adults, children, and infants
  • The AHA Chain of Survival, specifically the BLS components
  • Important early use of an AED
  • Effective ventilations using a barrier device
  • Importance of teams in multi-rescuer resuscitation and performance as an effective team member during multi-rescuer CPR
  • Relief of foreign-body airway obstruction (choking) for adults and infants

CP ‘R’ US’s basic life support courses have three certification process options to obtain an American Heart Association Certification.
There are two options to obtain a BLS certification. Instructor LED and blended learning.
Instructor-led courses are led by the A instructor, including video observation, hands-on skills demonstration, and a multiple choice 25-question test. Upon completing the class and passing the multiple choice 25-question test, the student can obtain an AHA Electronic certification card within the same day of completion of the course.
Initial courses are designed for candidates. If the candidate is a first-time basic life support provider, they would need to attend an Initial course of approximately 4 1/2 hours, depending on the accuracy of the hands-on skills demonstration.
Renewal courses are designed for providers with a current unexpired AHA basic life support electronic certification card that is up for renewal. The class for renewal is approximately 2 1/2 hours long and requires:

Another organization’s unexpired card is unacceptable. Thus, the current card must be through the American Heart Association to be honored as a current card and eligible for renewal. Candidates that cannot produce an unexpired HA certification will need to take an initial course if the card has expired beyond 30 days.

BLS In-Person Update

This 3-hour, in-person renewal training will include a video observation, a hands-on skills demonstration, and a 25-question multiple-choice test to grant eligibility for a BLS certification.

Blended learning is a great option for candidates or providers who have busy schedules and needs flexibility. Blended learning allows you to complete an online portion at your own pace and requires scheduling an in-person hands-on skills demonstration with an instructor.
The hands-on skills demonstration usually doesn't exceed one hour. It can be as quick as 30 minutes, depending on the provider's ability to perform adequate compression delivery, ventilation, and the use of an AED on an adult infant in a child, as well as the choking maneuvers for the adult infant. When a candidate or provider opts into the blended learning process, there’s a two-part process to be completed in order to obtain an AHA S electronic certification.

Advanced Cardiopulmonary Life Support

The AHA’s ACLS course builds on the foundation of lifesaving BLS skills, emphasizing the importance of continuous, high-quality CPR. Reflects science and education from the American Heart Association Guidelines Update for CPR and Emergency Cardiovascular Care (ECC).

Who should take this course?
  • Basic life support skills, including effective chest compressions, use of a bag-mask device, and use of an AED
  • Recognition and early management of respiratory and cardiac arrest
  • Recognition and early management of peri-arrest conditions such as symptomatic bradycardia
  • Airway management
  • Related pharmacology
  • Management of ACS and stroke
  • Effective communication as a member and leader of a resuscitation team

CP ‘R’ US’s basic life support courses have three certification process options to obtain an American Heart Association Certification.

Instructor LED and blended learning.

Instructor-led courses are led by the A instructor and include video observation, hands-on skills demonstration, and a multiple choice 25-question test. Upon completing the class and passing the multiple choice 25-question test, the student can obtain an AHA Electronic certification card within the same day of completion of the course.
Initial courses are designed for candidates. If the candidate is a first-time basic life support Provider, they would need to attend an Initial course, which is approximately 4 1/2 hours, depending on the accuracy of the Hands-on skills demonstration.
Renewal courses are designed for providers with a current unexpired AHA basic life support electronic certification card and are up for renewal. This class is for renewal, is approximately 2 1/2 hours, and requires; Video observation, Hands on skills demonstration, and passing at least 84% of a 25-question multiple-choice test to obtain an electronic AHA BLS certification card. Another organization’s unexpired card is unacceptable. The current card must be through the American Heart Association in order to be honored as a current card and eligible for renewal. Candidates that cannot produce an unexpired HA certification Will need to take an initial course if the card has expired beyond 30 days.

Blended learning

Blended learning is a great option for candidates or providers. Have busy schedules. And needs flexibility. Blended learning allows you to complete an online portion at your own pace and requires scheduling an in-person hands-on skills demonstration with an instructor. The hands-on skills demonstration usually doesn't exceed one hour. It can be as quick as 30 minutes, depending on the provider's ability to perform adequate compression delivery, ventilation, and the use of an AED on an adult infant in a child, as well as the choking maneuvers for the adult infant when a candidate or provider opts into the blended learning process. It does have a two-part process to be completed in order to obtain. And an AHA S electronic certification one. The provider must complete the online portion in its entirety.
2. They must complete the passing hands-on demonstration with an instructor, no less than 84% for the hands-on demonstration, with the online portion combined with the hands-on skills demonstration grants, the passing, and eligibility of the official 2-year certification.
This process applies to ACLS, BLS, and PALS courses.

Pediatric Advanced Life Support

For healthcare providers who respond to emergencies in infants and children and for personnel in emergency response, emergency medicine, intensive care, and critical care units.

What does this course teach?

The PALS Provider Course aims to improve outcomes for pediatric patients by preparing healthcare providers to effectively recognize and intervene in patients with respiratory emergencies, shock, and cardiopulmonary arrest by using high‐performance team dynamics and high‐quality individual skills. The course includes a series of case scenario practices with simulations that reinforce essential concepts. Upon completing all the patient cases, students must pass the multiple-choice exam with a minimum score of 84%.

  • Perform high‐quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) per American Heart Association (AHA) basic life support (BLS) recommendations
  • Differentiate between patients who do and do not require immediate intervention
  • Recognize cardiopulmonary arrest early and begin CPR within 10 seconds
  • Apply team dynamics
  • Differentiate between respiratory distress and failure
  • Perform early interventions for respiratory distress and failure
  • Differentiate between compensated and decompensated (hypotensive) shock
  • Perform early interventions for the treatment of shock Differentiate between unstable and stable patients with arrhythmias
  • Describe clinical characteristics of instability in patients with arrhythmias
  • Implement post-cardiac arrest management

 

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